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MAY 2019 TECHNICAL LUNCHEON


May 15th, 2019 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

TECHNICAL LUNCHEON

May 15, 2019

 

SPEAKER:  Steve Chipera,

Chesapeake Energy   

  

In Situ Mineralogical Analyses on Mars: Tales from the CHEMN XRD Instrument operating on the Mars Curiosity Rover

 

OCGS DEVON GEOSCIENCE CENTER

10 NW 6th Street

OKLAHOMA CITY, OK  73102

 

WEDNESDAY May 15, 2019

LUNCH 11:30am – 1:00pm

MEMBER COST $25.00

VISITOR COST $35.00

 

RESERVATIONS MUST BE SUBMITTED Friday May 10, 2019 BY 12:00 NOON

Abstract:

    The Curiosity rover landed on August 5th, 2012 on the surface of Mars in Gail Crater.  It has been operating 6 and a half years (over 2400 Sols - Martian days) and driven 20.5 kilometers from the landing site, over the crater bottom, across dune fields, and is currently progressing up the side of Mount Sharp.  Although Gail Crater and Mount Sharp have been mapped in a coarse sense for composition and mineralogy from various orbiters circling above, the Curiosity rover is providing significantly finer detail and ground truth.  Curiosity has on board 10 suites of analytical instruments; the two primary science instruments consist of CHEMIN, a combined XRD/XRF collecting CHEmical and MINeral information, and SAM (Sample Analysis on Mars), which is a package containing a Gas Chromatograph, quadrupole Mass Spectrometer, and tunable laser to conduct analyses for organics and other compounds.

    Although all landed-missions had some form of chemical-analytical capability, this is the first mission that could provide unique and distinct mineralogy using X-ray diffraction.  Along with the expected basaltic and andesitic mineralogy, some significant surprises have been found, and many more are yet to come.  Clay minerals were found where they were not expected, highly siliceous samples containing tridymite were encountered, significant cross-cutting veins of anhydrite are observed.  Regardless of origin and history, amorphous material appears to be ubiquitous to all samples.

     This talk will provide a brief overview of 1: what is involved developing an instrument for extraplanetary missions (CHEMIN),  2: the MSL mission and the Curiosity Rover, and  3: some of the science that has occurred along the way. 

 

Biography

Education:

BS degree in Geology from the University of Minnesota

MS degree in Geology from the University of North Dakota

 

Experience:

Steve spent 23 years at the Los Alamos National Laboratory where he was a Staff Scientist and then 7 years as Manager of the Geochemistry and Geomaterials Research Laboratories.

 He has been with Chesapeake Energy for almost 12 years and is currently a Science Advisor at their Reservoir Technology Center.

 Research and Publications: 

Steve’s research interests include the mineralogy, petrology, and geochemistry of igneous and sedimentary rocks and specifically, their alteration assemblages; thermodynamic modeling of mineral stability; the interaction of water with hydrous phases, quantitative phase analysis by X-ray powder diffraction; and miniaturized XRD/XRF instrumentation for terrestrial and extraterrestrial applications.  Currently, he is a member of the CHEMIN team which has a miniaturized XRD instrument operating on the Mars Curiosity Rover.

 Steve is an author/coauthor on ~100 peer-reviewed publications, 3 book chapters, and more than 250 abstracts presented at national meetings.

 Attendance without reservation will not be possible.  Reservations must be cancelled by May 10, 2019 at noon to avoid being charged.  Thank you for your consideration.